Recommendations for projects:

  • Have a native English speaker read and correct your final draft, if at all possible.
  • If you have a physical artifact, make sure there is at least one photo of it included
  • Even better – add a link to a video, especially if the thing moves.
  • If you are using abbreviations, make sure to write them out the first time
  • Do give an introduction into the prior art in what you are studying and clearly delineate your contribution from previous work by explicitly stating your novelty/contribution.
  • Avoid hyperbolic claims (“the most perfect”, “best” etc) about how good your work is. Jury is tasked with assessing that, not you.
  • Try to get in touch with a scientist/engineer actually working on similar problems in your country and have him read your final draft. He/she will have good questions and suggestions for improvements. If you have won the national contest, he will be very unlikely to refuse to help. Ask your supervisor for help in finding and contacting the person, if you are too shy yourself.
  • If possible, get feedback from potential users and write that up as well: what they like and what they do not like.
  • Do not be afraid to discuss weaknesses and shortcomings of your work. In fact, do so proudly. It gives a much better impression of your level of understanding of what you are doing.
  • Explain what in your opinion was the hardest part of your project. That will give a lot of useful information to a jury member both about the project and your understanding of it.
  • Do not feel ashamed about leaving things out to fit 10 pages. Everyone has to, and jury is aware of that fact.